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zombie commando
06-22-2005, 09:30 AM
FULCI LIVES

Here's a pretty bad ass article on the web that I found explaining many of Fulci's works with a prose common amongst film critics......

http://www.sensesofcinema.com/contents/directors/04/fulci.html

The Horrors

The project of describing the best of Fulci's films, his gory horrors, is a paradoxical one. Being required to describe these films might expose them as poverty stricken within the constraints of signification of images, narrative and their capacity to be viewed as a readerly text. In order to evoke the powers of Fulci's best films I must first reconfigure the seemingly given paradigms of cinema. Here I ask the reader to variously rethink or forgo these concepts as necessary for cinematic pleasure. This involves letting go of: narrative as a temporalisation of viewing pleasure which accumulates the past to contextualise the present and lay out an expected future; images as deferrals to meaning, signs to be read or interpreted; characters as integral to plot, both in film in general and horror in particular as that which must be conceptually characterised in order to be meaningfully killed off or destroyed; narrative as intelligible contextualiser of action; exploitation as gratuitously existing for its own sake or to affirm and intensify traditional axes of oppression in society; gore as demeaning or a lesser focus in the impartation of visual expression; pleasure as pleasurable; repulsion as unpleasurable; violence as inherently aggressive; horror as dealing only with notions of returned repression, infantilism or catharsis. I ask the reader, in the tradition of Lyotard's economy of libidinal pleasure, to shift their address from why or what the images mean to how they affect.

Fulci began his gore film series with the George A. Romero figlia Zombi 2, a surprisingly engaging reconfiguration of the Living Dead mythos, where the ethnographic zombie films of Val Lewton contracted with
Zombi 2 the bodily horror of George Romero in the USA and Jorge Grau in the UK. Fulci's success in presenting gore anchors on his acute understanding of violence against bodies as reliant on the particular significations of the parts of the body being destroyed, rather than a semiotic destruction of flesh in general, hence his propensity for showing eyeball puncturing. His zombies are cheap looking, but this makes them unnerving in their abject grittiness, rather than unconvincing. Fulci followed Zombi 2 with his opus latifundium, his “real estate” trilogy: Paura nella città dei morti viventi (City of the Living Dead, 1980), a Lovecraftian story of a priest who hangs himself thus opening the gates of hell; L'aldila, about a hotel which is a gate to hell (noticing a theme?), and Quella villa accanto al cimitero (House by the Cemetery, 1981), about one Dr Freudstein – surely one of the best ever character names in a film! – who, by transplanting parts of his victims to his body for over a century has managed to stay alive, although, in keeping with the trilogic theme, he looks like hell. These films saw the first paradigmatic shift in Fulci's interest from the temporality that defines traditional cinematic narrative, to a focus on space, broadly meaning atmosphere, acts which may or may not bear relevance to preceding and successive images, claustrophobic mise en scène set within houses and damp landscapes which drip with the viscosity of the bodies crawling therein. Fulci manages this oppressive environment even in the clinical world of the pathology lab or the infinite space of the bridge which leads to the island of New Orleans, both in L'Aldila. These films resonate with places rather than people, events rather than story, ergo ecstasy (event outside of temporality) rather than time. Fulci states “Our only refuge is to remain in the world but outside time” (1). It may seem a stretch to claim Fulci distorts time in the same way as more deliberately artistic filmmakers; his films retain a rudimentary relationship with narrative, whether for the sake of loose coherence or the producers of the film.

These three films saw Fulci collaborate with screenwriter Dardano Sacchetti, who had previously written Il gatto a nove code (with Argento) and Reazione for Bava. Sacchetti later wrote the stories for Lamberto Bava's first films, La Chiesa (1989) for Michele Soavi, two screenplays for Ruggero Deodato and Sergio Martino (in collaboration with the brilliant Ernesto Gastaldi) and the strange yet fascinating Apocalypse domani (1980) for Antonio Margheriti. For Fulci, Sacchetti wrote the giallo 7 note and his later gore films Manhattan Baby (1982) and the controversial slasher pseudo-giallo film Lo squartatore di New York (The New York Ripper, 1982). The third member of the trilogy responsible for Fulci's most accomplished work is Giannetto De Rossi, whose special effects are more interested in the body transformed rather than destroyed by violence. It is this alchemical combination that formed the delirious dream-like worlds of the real-estate trilogy. Whether the viewer awaits a narrative to explicate the murders, the reanimation of the dead and the baroque methods of death, or whether they are there to explore the sensations of the images unto themselves, these films offer images as possibility – the possibility of experiencing film otherwise, the possibility of meaning without the satisfaction of affirmation of interpretation, and the possibility of the masochism of watching horror, an eternal anticipation that confuses rather than pleases when the shocking images arrive.

In Cinema 2, Gilles Deleuze states:

[firstness] is not a sensation, a feeling, an idea, but the quality of a possible sensation, feeling or idea. Firstness is thus a category of the possible: it gives a proper consistency to the possible, it expresses the possible without actualising it…this is exactly what the affection-image is (2).
If firstness is the primary moment, before language orients effect toward the eternal deferral of meaning through signification, then firstness repudiates language as these films repudiate film language. Because films do unfold in time and because these films are not experimental, they do indeed include rudimentary road signs for the viewer, but these are distraction rather than moments of intensification which inhabit the films. The narratives are there but they don't matter, what matters is the very matter of the images, their materiality. Deleuze calls the image which subjugates movement to time the chronosign:

…the before and after are no longer themselves a matter of external empirical succession, but of the intrinsic quality of that which becomes in time. Becoming can in fact be defined as that which transforms an empirical sequence into a series: a burst of series (3).

zombie commando
06-22-2005, 09:31 AM
L'Aldila These films are about intrinsic quality, texture, consistency. For this reason they affect sense rather than intellect – confusion, disgust, suffering, delight at the pangs of horror are the qualities these films evoke. The screen is not the marker between actual and virtual but, in Paul Virilio's words, the “osmotic membrane” (4). Nowhere does this osmosis become more apparent than in films which affront the sensoria of the viewer without recourse to the dividing wall of signification and deferral to meaning which protects the viewer from affect. Pierced eyeballs, crucifixion, spiders eating a face, bodies melted with acid, pneumatic drills through the head, but also the aesthetics of white blinded eyeballs, the tension of Dr Freudstein in Quella forcing a child's head against a door into which his parents are hurling an axe to 'save' him from the bloody Doctor, the blind Emily having her throat torn out by her guide dog (in a perverse homage to Argento's Suspiria) and Fabio Frizzi's scores for Paura and L'Aldila which give Goblin a run for their money all create impossible worlds which demand a visceral affiliation. I should add, to describe what happens in these films, which may make them sound shocking or provocatively perverse, entirely fails to express the certain qualities of these images that makes any description of them inherently redundant – it is not what happens or why it happens, but how it happens that makes these images seductive. The worlds of Fulci's real estate trilogy are ridiculous, false, phantasmatic but perhaps it is this very phantasy which protects the films from the mean spiritedness that sometimes threatens to overwhelm those violent gore films which locate themselves entirely within the real world, turning baroque violence into vulgar and potentially misogynistic sadism. D.N. Rodowick exploring the wonder of these worlds states:

Believe [quotes Deleuze's Cinema 2] “not in a different world but in a link between humanity and the world…to believe in this as in the impossible, the unthinkable, which nonetheless cannot be but thought” (1989: 170)… Belief is no longer belief in a transcendent world, but a belief in this world and its powers of transformation. It is believing in the body, in its relation to thought, and in the potential of the body and thought to affirm their powers of change and their receptivity to transformation. The transformation of belief as will to power is an affirmation of time and its powers of becoming and of faith in a life that can be transformed by an active and creative will. This is the power to become-other in thought, and then, to become-other (5).
I will say little more about these films, reflecting their repudiation of signification, only to urge the reader to rent them, buy them, see them and, most importantly, open up to them.


Lo squartatore di New York Perhaps due to an increasing cynicism borne of a lack of recognition, sadly Fulci resigned himself to making the particularly nihilistically violent films his baroque films had so adamantly challenged. Some may argue this begins with Lo squartatore di New York, a film many critics see as inherently misogynistic due to its violence against women and its all-women-are-whores-complex killer. This response seems at best rudimentary and at worst vacuously automatic. Beyond the fact that men are killed in an equally graphic, if less Freudian, way than the women, the film is a straight murder mystery which may be placed alongside other gialli, such as Sergio Martino's I corpi presentano tracce di violenza carnale (1973), or even Argento's Tenebre (1982). What makes the film different is Fulci's destylised violence. Arguably one could say this makes the violence against women more abject and therefore more sensitive to the desexualisation of female directed violence. Similarly one could claim the film is particularly remarkable in its representation of women as victims due to the prevalence of strong and interesting women in the real-estate trilogy. Essentially I believe the backlash against this film is a disgust at gore misdirected to an ad hoc complaint of misogyny which ignores the different nuances and inspirations behind real misogyny in films such as Bloodsucking Freaks (Joel M. Reed, 1976), Maniac (William Lustig, 1980) and the recent Ted Bundy (Matthew Bright, 2002), repulsive due to their light-hearted making humorous of violence against women. Polarising the subject matter of Squartatore Fulci made, in the same year, Manhattan Baby, which continued his sensitive interest in children and their role in horror films (seen later in his telemovie La dolce casa degli orrori, 1989). He also adapted Poe in Il gatto nero (1981), flat perhaps due to Fulci's tendency toward themes more Lovecraftian than Poesque.

After this early 1980s flurry Fulci began his descent into films which express a clear lack of interest in his art. Due to the plethora of films I will focus the following summary on key films which signify various aspects of Fulci's later work. Un gatto nel cervello (1990, dedicated to Clive Barker, “my only friend”) is a composite of all the gore from Fulci's previous films, told in a story about a film director called Lucio Fulci, played by Fulci (an extension of his Hitchcockian habit of playing cameos in his films), which both parodies his label as the Italian godfather of gore, and mourns this label's misunderstanding of a true vision beneath, yet elaborated through, the gore. Fulci's worst film, not due to ineptitude but a real misogynistic turn, Quando Alice ruppe lo specchio (1988), where female ugliness vindicates gratuitously sadistic murder, is ambiguously something which gives the kind of audience he despises what they think they want, and a bitter reflection on his career. The later phantasy horror films, here more gothic than baroque due to their turn from corporeal viscerality to ethereal atmosphere, are seductive and point to Fulci's remaining potential. Il fantasma di Sodoma (1988), a story of Nazi ghosts haunting a group of teenagers, and Demonia (1990), where Loudonic nuns drink blood and haunt archaeologists, are interesting interpretations from the standard Italian genres of nunsploitation and Nazi fetishism alongside teens-in-peril. The films are headily impressive, the air almost tactile, the atmosphere acrid and voluminous. These films make flesh of phantasms and offer ghosts which are vague in a visceral rather than ethereal manner. However nothing of the residue of Fulci's talents in the film can make them any more than they are, which is a series of almost poignant reminders of Fulci becoming somewhat of a simulacrum of what he once was. They are pretty, sometimes delicious, but irredeemably diluted. This prettiness without substance reached its zenith with Fulci's final film Voci dal profondo (1994). Fulci died destitute from diabetes on March 13, 1996.
Concluding Remarks

This tour of Fulci films will seem, particularly in the earlier summaries, rudimentary and not entirely sensitive to a thorough analysis of what is here being called a Great Director. Completists may suggest I am fetishising certain films, perhaps because of my own proclivity toward the horror genre, at the expense of the redeeming features of others. However, unlike other great directors, who exhibit strengths and weaknesses in a body of films that are coherent and present disparate aspects of a generally unified auteurist vision, Fulci expressed a vision that not only strained against the limits of his tight budgets and the lack of respect he received in his lifetime beyond the fringe of cult film aficionados, but also the limits of cinematic form itself. While paying limited address to the necessities of narrative, character, resolution and plot, unlike other film directors he did not transform these in a project of deliberate challenge or deconstruction of image and perception. Fulci seems more to be possessed of a certain conceptual world, a fleshy and dark world which insinuates the infinity of possibilities of thought and the affectivity of art beyond signification itself, even subversive signification. Far from being the radical challenge to good taste or fetishised for being a driving force in the denouncement in Britain of the video nasty that many (mostly male) critics espouse him as, Fulci does not seem to care for those conventions he flouts. Although the claim may place me at a lunatic fringe, I am tempted to align his vision with those of other mystics such as William Blake, Arthur Machen, H.P. Lovecraft and Austen Spare, someone more deserving of analysis through Deleuze and Guattari rather than film theory. These people were not interested in particular projects so much as the project of possibility itself. That they came from the disparate arenas of poetry, prose, philosophy and art matters less than their shared philosophies, and here Fulci is the visionary who is an accidental filmmaker, rather than a director with something to say. The act of viewing Fulci's best films is similarly an act of possibility, opening up to the creative act of thought launching self outside the self, thought from the outside, and the involution of image, flesh and thought that reflects itself the incarnation of these three elements in the trinity of Fulci, Rossi and Sacchetti. He is yet to receive academic attention beyond rudimentary pop criticism, and the loss of this director is made more acerbic through the knowledge that he will never see the acclaim his films may one day (deservedly) receive
.

Chomp_on_this
06-22-2005, 09:59 AM
Shit man. That was an interesting read. It really puts a positive spin on some of his pretty bad films. I wish they would have gone into more deatil about Touch of Death...that film is really starting to grow on me.

Speaking of Fulci...did anybody purchase that Anchor Bay 25th Anniversary Zombi 2 DVD? How is that? Is it really worth the pick up, or would I be safe with just the Special Edition AB released awhile back?

Maxvayne
06-22-2005, 11:22 AM
Originally posted by Chomp_on_this

Speaking of Fulci...did anybody purchase that Anchor Bay 25th Anniversary Zombi 2 DVD? How is that? Is it really worth the pick up, or would I be safe with just the Special Edition AB released awhile back?

That really was a great read.


Shriek Show put it out, but the point is that it is worth the pick-up, the documentarys are great, it even has some funny Fulci storys on there too.

Chomp_on_this
06-22-2005, 12:05 PM
Originally posted by Maxvayne
That really was a great read.


Shriek Show put it out, but the point is that it is worth the pick-up, the documentarys are great, it even has some funny Fulci storys on there too.

Yea..Shriek, that's what I meant to say. I heard there was a poster included...is that true? And how much different is the Uncut version? Anything extremely worth the watch? Is it better than the original?

Maxvayne
06-22-2005, 12:18 PM
Originally posted by Chomp_on_this
Yea..Shriek, that's what I meant to say. I heard there was a poster included...is that true? And how much different is the Uncut version? Anything extremely worth the watch? Is it better than the original?


A poster is indeed included. I believe it's of the original poster in Italy, it has the front cover of the DVD on it basically, while I believe that nothing was cut on the old Anchor Bay DVD it dose have a way better transfer (which is also the same print used on the Blue Underground DVD.). I say the whole 98 minute documentary is worth it, and never bored me to tears. There is also a bunch of Zombie trailers from Shriek Shows titles, although the only one that really stood out to me was Zombi 3.

Here is a more indepth review:http://www.horrordvds.com/modules.php?name=Reviews&file=viewreview&id=270

Chomp_on_this
06-22-2005, 12:24 PM
Good God...I had no idea the shitty quality of Anchor Bay's DVD. SS's looks extraordinarily better. And a 98 minute documentary? Shit...I am picking this hog up on Friday.

Goddamn, I bet it feels like watching a completely different film when you slap SS's in for spin eh?

MMyers89
06-22-2005, 01:19 PM
Well, It's a good read, but whoever wrote it puts waaay to many fancy words in there, for the sake of sounding smart. There are things in there that could be said with a couple words, but he throws out many many lines of fancy talk, which really means nothing.

Maxvayne
06-22-2005, 03:07 PM
Originally posted by Chomp_on_this
Good God...I had no idea the shitty quality of Anchor Bay's DVD. SS's looks extraordinarily better. And a 98 minute documentary? Shit...I am picking this hog up on Friday.

Goddamn, I bet it feels like watching a completely different film when you slap SS's in for spin eh?


Nah, I never owned the Bay DVD, but I did see the VHS(Even uncut) of that, and yes it did look like shit.

zombie commando
06-23-2005, 09:15 AM
Originally posted by MMyers89
Well, It's a good read, but whoever wrote it puts waaay to many fancy words in there, for the sake of sounding smart. There are things in there that could be said with a couple words, but he throws out many many lines of fancy talk, which really means nothing. Damn people who use multisyllabic words....:rolleyes:

MMyers89
06-23-2005, 09:49 AM
Originally posted by zombie commando
Damn people who use multisyllabic words....:rolleyes:

Nah, it's that it's just...ah nevermind

DarknessBDJM
06-24-2005, 02:00 AM
Originally posted by MMyers89
Nah, it's that it's just...ah nevermind

Hey, I know what you're saying and I agree with you.

zombie commando
09-10-2005, 01:04 PM
Another essay on Fulci.........
http://www.geraldpeary.com/essays/def/fulci.html


Lucio Fulci

Except among advanced splatter-movie geeks, few in America are familiar with the blood-drenched horror cinema of Lucio Fulci, whose 1981 L'Aldila (The Beyond) (aka 7 Doors of Death) plays midnights at the Coolidge Corner. However, his accolytes regard Fulci as one of Italy's three masters of the supernatural, along with Dario (Suspiria) Argento and Mario (Black Sunday) Bava.

In such films as Zombie, The New York Ripper, and Don't Torture the Duckling, Fulci combined the enterprising low-budget storytelling of Roger Corman with the grisly, gushing-wound acumen of George Romero: Dawn of the Dead, and way beyond. Also, an enthusiastic, obsessive DeSadean cruelty. There are more ways to slit a throat than you can imagine, more ways to gouge an eyeball, and you'll see them all when enmeshed in the oeuvre of Lucio Fulcio.

Not for everybody, this medical student-turned-goremaker, who died of diabetic shock in 1996.

Much of his stuff is available at weirdo video outlets. There's a mini-Fulci section at Pipeline Records near Harvard Square, and I could have spent a jubilant Fulci month with his many movies on tape at Video Oasis Ltd. in Cambridge near Lechmere. Instead, I watched, for background, three recommended ones.

The Gates of Hell (1981). Incomprehensible borrowings from H.P. Lovecraft - the town of Dunwich, the frightening, ancient "Book of Enoch" - uncomfortably grafted onto a New York-set, smart-ass detective mystery. Plus there's an unstuck-in-time priest on a hangrope who pops into the movie whenever, always causing havoc. It's all dumb and incoherent but with two unforgettable nightmare scenes. The first: the priest gives a young woman in a car a hypnotic evil eye, until her own bloodened eyes pop out of their sockets, until she vomits up her intestinal tract. The second: genuinely on a par with Hitchcock, a man standing in a green cemetery on a beautiful day hears, perhaps, some dim, far-away noises. Cut inside a blue-lit grave, where a buried-alive woman is scratching away at her tomb, screaming up into the dirt.

The House By the Cemetery (1982). Roman interiors, Massachusetts exteriors. A professor rents a 19th century house and puts his wife and child there while he does research. Unfortunately, he didn't see the prologue to this movie, in which, in this very same Victorian abode, a nice young lady gets a knife through the back of her head, protruding through her mouth, and it's revealed that a certain Dr. Freudstin once resided there, with "a penchant for illegal experiments."

Nice spooky music, but a rather primitive picture. For much of it, Fulci shows a talent for gruesome knifings, that's about all. The wife hires people she shouldn't, such as a walking-dead babysitter for her boy. There's a fairly chilling ending involving a zombie infested with maggots.

Nightmare Concert (Aka, A Cat in the Brain) (1990). Here's the Fulci movie I'd revive, because it has a resonance beyond its bloodbucket imagery. The director stars as himself, Lucio Fulci, an increasingly deranged horror director becoming totally bonkers in the midst of filmmaking. "It's Eraserhead made by an old man," Fulci once described it. He shows his typical day at Cinecitta, the Roman studio where Fellini also filmed. In the morning, Fulci shoots the saga of a contemporary-day cannibal who makes a steak and hamburger out of a cadaver. Then Fulci breaks for lunch, and almost spits up when the waiter at a stuffy restaurant brings over the special of the day, steak tartare.

In the afternoon's shooting, Fulci really goes crazy. He shows closeups of himself directing a throat slitting. "Kill her! Slap her! Like it! Enjoy it!" he screams out, oozing vicarious homicidal pleasure. It's a courageous, revelatory scene, maybe what would have been exposed if the camera ever spun to let us watch, say, Brian De Palma, or old Alfred himself.

Which brings me finally to The Undead, Fulci's movie actually playing here in 35mm. I congratulate the Coolidge for stretching out to show what many consider Fulci's greatest movie. But next to Nightmare Concert, for instance, I found The Undead mostly dull, awkwardly made, and unoriginal. "Twenty-five years ago..., critics called my art 'shit,'" Fulci wryly observed. "Now critic want to call my shit 'art.'" The Undead is yet another genre tale of an inherited estate (this one a hotel in the Lousiana bayous) with bad vibes from the past. The extraordinarily violent prologue shows all: in 1927, a man is hatcheted, crucified, his face melted away. "You ungodly warlock," shout his murderers, as this hotel sits upon one of the Seven Gates to Hell.

In the 1980s, as the hotel is being restored by its female yuppie owner, the Inferno breaks loose, with various workmen killed in variously hideous ways. Forget characterization or a scary story. The payoffs in The Undead are brief moments of extreme bloodshed: a German shepherd attacking its blind owner, an army of tarantulas eating a human face.

Lucio Fulci is not for everybody.

Creepingmouth
09-15-2005, 12:51 PM
You know what is funny?
In Italy nobody talks about Fulci.Only people who really like horror movies know who he really is.I find really annoying hearing everybody talking about Argento but completely ignoring Fulci.

zombie commando
01-11-2006, 02:36 PM
I think what throws people off about Fulci is that he challenges the constructs of cinematic storytelling. Instead of focusing on symbolism, or deconstruction of meaning he goes to evoke more of a reactionary emotion with his work. He's all about creating an osmosis of feeling between the tube and it's client while simultaneously removing constructs of time. The hallucinatory 'vibe' is what really matters in most of his work.

Shamrock-Robot
07-23-2007, 03:42 AM
Great Article.

Khan
07-23-2007, 04:13 AM
Excellent thread!

Fulci was a true master of horror.

Shamrock-Robot
07-24-2007, 01:23 AM
In the next few weeks Im gonna try and get The Beyond and City Of The Living Dead, Can anyone tell me what im in for, Ive seen Zombi so I kinda know what to expect but still.

Khan
07-24-2007, 03:53 AM
There is lots of gore, but some great atmosphere to go along with it.

Shamrock-Robot
07-24-2007, 04:53 AM
Sounds good.

Khan
07-24-2007, 11:32 AM
The Beyond has a really funny error in it if you pay attention.

Shamrock-Robot
07-24-2007, 07:47 PM
I cant wait to check it out.

horrornut
12-23-2007, 12:49 PM
Speaking of ZOMBIE 2 (1980) I've got a chance to pick up a 35mm print of this title. I've not seen it. Would this be a "keeper" on the big screen or is one viewing enough on a TV set??
Your opinions please!!

Khan
12-23-2007, 12:52 PM
I envy you! :bow:

Sadly, I have only seen it on the small screen, but I would love to see it in theaters.

This is a keeper.

horrornut
12-23-2007, 01:49 PM
Thanks for your input.

Khan
12-23-2007, 01:54 PM
No prob. :)

I love that movie.

zombie commando
12-23-2007, 04:33 PM
Speaking of ZOMBIE 2 (1980) I've got a chance to pick up a 35mm print of this title. I've not seen it. Would this be a "keeper" on the big screen or is one viewing enough on a TV set??
Your opinions please!!

Definitely get it. Zombi 2 rules!

Dr Hoffman
12-27-2007, 11:04 AM
The Beyond has a really funny error in it if you pay attention.

Would that be the gun loading in the elevator you are referring to?:winkgrin:

Khan
12-27-2007, 04:51 PM
That, and the "Do Not Entry" sign. :)

horrornut
01-06-2008, 06:43 PM
I envy you! :bow:

Sadly, I have only seen it on the small screen, but I would love to see it in theaters.

This is a keeper.
Well, bad news is that when I called the seller back he sold the print to someone else. Not to worry.......there will be other prints out there. I turned down a print of "Rejects".....no thanks.

Khan
01-06-2008, 06:47 PM
If I may ask (you don't have to answer in public), how much was it being offered for?

horrornut
01-06-2008, 06:52 PM
If I may ask (you don't have to answer in public), how much was it being offered for?
Check your PM

MaDMaNMaRz
01-24-2008, 01:23 AM
What a great thread! I'm a HUGE fan of Lucio Fulci. He's one of my all-time favorite directors.

My top 2 favorites are House by the Cemetery and City of the Living Dead.

Is anyone else here a fan of The Black Cat, and House of Clocks? I find those to be really underrated. The Black Cat was really suspenseful, and had a great score. Although, one problem with it was the OVERUSE of the closeup shots of the eyes. I think he overdid it in that one.

I finally found a copy of the 25th Anniversary Edition of Zombi 2. I've had the Anchor Bay DVD forever, so i'm happy to finally get the Shriek Show DVD.

Khan
01-24-2008, 04:41 AM
I have both Zombi 2 DVD's as well.

zombie commando
01-24-2008, 10:57 AM
Is anyone else here a fan of The Black Cat, and House of Clocks? I got The Black Cat but I'm not really a huge fan of it.